Education and Training Workgroup – Call for Feedback!

Caitlin Stover, who is the leader for our Education and Training Workgroup, is calling for feedback from Nursing Section members!  They are examining the American Association of Medical Colleges recent document titled “Implementing Curricular and Institutional AAMC LGBT Publication_CoverClimate Changes to Improve Health Care for Individuals Who Are LGBT, Gender Nonconforming, or Born with DSD,” and are considering ways in which the recommendations in this publication can be transferred to nursing.  And they want out feedback on this!  Caitlin tells me that we do not have to read the entire paper (unless of course we want to!) and we do not have to answer all of their questions … but any feedback we can provide will be be very helpful!

You can download the entire document for free here.

Here are their questions!

1. What do you think about the document, and its significance in helping the profession of nursing promote LGBT education and training?

2. What aspects of the document can we adopt to nursing education?

3. What aspects of the document are being done in nursing already?

4. How do we facilitate implementation in nursing?

5. What challenges do you think that the profession will encounter and how can we overcome them?

2 comments

  1. Hello Colleagues,

    I trust everyone is enjoying rest and relaxation during the holidays.
    I want to share my thoughts on the “Implementing Curricular and Institutional AAMC LGBT Publication_CoverClimate Changes to Improve Health Care for Individuals Who Are LGBT, Gender Nonconforming, or Born with DSD” document by the AAMC.

    Thoughts:

    1. What do you think about the document, and its significance in helping the profession of nursing promote LGBT education and training?

    This is a very thorough document! It reads likes a primer on how to educate the the future health professional, not just for LGBT health topics, but on the process of education itself. At times it reads like a cookbook (i mean this in a positive sense) and a bit repetitive but overall the presentation flows logically.

    The section/discussion on Competency-Based Education (pp. 40-44) resonates well with the challenges we face in nursing education, seeking to answer the proverbial question on “what competencies do nurses need?” And how do we measure.

    The discussion on the role of resiliency and the enormous potential for providers to boost the resiliency reserve of LGBT patients rest well in the domains of nurses – both traditional or advance practice. I think this is a competency that is not fully addressed in the “Essentials” espoused by the AACN.

    There is a nurse in the advisory committee of the AAMC and has edited sections of the document. Her name is Carey Roth. I wonder if we can invite her to the next GLMA Nursing Summit to present?

    The use of “patients who may be or who are LGBTQI…” as opposed to “LGBTQI patients…” is good template for use in discourse within these topics.

    There was repeated for faculty to model behaviors we want our students to practice with regards to LGBT practice competence. Likewise, there was emphasis on having knowledgeable faculty to teach these topics. These are two important themes that can be addressed by the education section.

    As can be expected, there were very limited references from nursing cited by the document. This should inspire us to write and publish more on this topics as we are still behind on this.

    2. What aspects of the document can we adopt to nursing education?

    It would be ideal if nursing will come up with a similar document (AACN? NLN?). The format used by AAMC can be adopted, using a nursing language and creating nursing-based competencies. I would encourage the educators among us to review the “Essentials” for BSN, masters and doctoral education espoused by the AANC and see if we can create LGBT health nursing competencies based on the general domains.

    3. What aspects of the document are being done in nursing already?

    This would be harder to answer. As it is the document admonishes very high standards for planning, implementing and evaluating efforts done in teaching LGBT health. The Nursing Section of the GLMA is on its way to answer this call. As everyone can agree, nursing is a competency-based education and we spend endless hours word smithing and fine tuning those outcomes. We can certainly develop LGBT health competencies aligned with the broader outcomes.

    4. How do we facilitate implementation in nursing?

    A similar document with the imprimatur from the AACN or NLN would catalyze the implementation into nursing. Educators can already use the clinical scenarios and discussion points on chapter 5 of the document. They are very thorough and specific. What I can recommend is for nursing to create similar clinical vignettes, but more on the low-impact, but higher-frequency events such as caring for children with lesbian parents, as opposed to low-frequency but higher impact scenarios such as iatrogenic issues of surgical gender-affirming surgeries. We can facilitate implementation of the great examples in this document by emailing it to our faculty colleagues (point out to them what pages are relevant). I suppose the education section has work to do in the next summit or before the summit!

    I do hope other will share their comments on the document.

    Regards,
    Fidel

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  2. Hi Everyone,
    I have managed to get through the AAMC guidelines, didn’t read every word but a good many of them and there are MANY! I agree with what you have posted Fidel. I think that there is all sorts of ways we can use the document as a framework for our own Nursing guidelines.
    To answer the questions:
    1. What do you think about the document, and its significance in helping the profession of nursing promote LGBT education and training?
    The document has much to offer. Some amount of work would be required to transition this document to meet the needs of nursing and other allied health professions. but the foundation is great. I think that our document would, in the end, be shorter as the guidelines that we create or the competencies are going to have to be somewhat less prescriptive and more theoretical in order to meet the needs of more than one profession.

    2. What aspects of the document can we adopt to nursing education?
    -The historical pieces found in the intro and Chapter 2 are interesting and help put the whole concept into context. I realize that it is challenging to teach young people about the struggles that the LGBT community has experienced when they weren’t even born around the time of Stonewall and other important political events!!!
    -The competencies in Chap 3 are short and sweet and to the point. Just what we could use to begin building out document. They would need to be looked at to incorporate nursing knowledge and ways of knowing but I don’t think that would be too challenging.
    -I agree with Fidel that the Clinical scenarios in Chapt 5 can be used almost immediately, provided that the focus be more nursing focused and less medical. including sufficient scenarios that cause students to explore the who, what, when, where, and how of communication would help to give them opportunities to reflect on their own biases and prejudices.

    3. What aspects of the document are being done in nursing already?
    This is a challenging question and really I can only speak for my School of Nursing. I would say that there are scattered bits and pieces being included by faculty who are either LGBT themselves or LGBT friendly, otherwise this subject is frequently not considered; mostly out of being oblivious to the issue as opposed to being negative or against the idea of including the subject. I would suggest that some of our biggest barriers to including this content are the faculty themselves and not the students. I find that the students are receptive to the information and on more than one occasion have indicated that this topic is already in the forefront of young practitioner minds. I would tend to disagree with this a bit, but I am glad that I am seeing at least this level of acceptance.

    4. How do we facilitate implementation in Nursing?
    Recognizing the barriers will be one of the biggest hurdles. Other issues are in the answer to the previous question. Distribution of the document to the many Schools of Nursing around North America. And that is not a cost-neutral endeavor!!! Identify Champions within the schools, states, or provinces who can help with making people aware of the need to adopt this content and to make it part of everyone’s education may help us.

    5. What challenges do you think that the profession will encounter and how can we overcome them?
    -culture of the School of Nursing
    -History of the Schools inclusivity/discrimination
    -The broad and somewhat scattered nature of inclusion of LGBTQI health in nursing curriculum. It can be included in EVERY course regardless of subject thereby making it a ‘normal’ part of health education.

    I think that these are all my thoughts for now. Hope it was helpful. I look forward to other thoughts and comments.
    Tracey

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